The History of the 6502 Processor.. Or How Your Spreadsheet Died From Dysentery… 🗓 🗺

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Date: July 17 2019.
Time: 05:00 PM to 06:30 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Ben Leadholm

Location:
3537 Zenith Avenue South
Minneapolis, Minnesota
United States 55416

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

Some of us are old enough to remember our first computer being the one of the Atari Game Systems, Atari 400 or 800, some form of Apple II, or the Commodore Vic 20 or C64.

There are fascinating histories behind the creation of the heart of most personal processing systems back in the late 70s and early to mid 80s.

We won’t focus on Intel’s 8080, the heart of the Altair, the first personal computer, and the computer that helped to spawn the HomeBrew Computer Club. Instead, we’ll start with Chuck Peddle, a microchip designer who left Motorola because the company didn’t want his idea of a stripped-down processor to eat market share away at their $300 68XX chip family.

Chuck jumps to MOS Technologies, and develops the 6502 Microprocessor, on sale for $25 in quantities of one.

It is this price point that attracts Steve Wozniak to build a working personal computer on plywood to plug into a TV called the Apple I, to show off at the HomeBrew Computer Club. Fifty Apple I circuit boards were sold for $666.66 each (roughly $3k today). Woz’s friend Steve Jobs thinks they could make a business selling pre-assembled computers, “1000 a week.”

There will be tales of intrigue, backstabbing, dirty tactics, and cutthroat competition from Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Nolan Bushnell, Jack Tramiel, and Bil Herd.

There may be 8-bit machines on display (Atari | Commodore | Apple).

Some time may be allocated to let others reminisce about their ‘6502 moments.

Biography:

A developer for almost 25 years, starting out with Excel macros and parlaying those skills to an entry-level development position. From VB3 to Ruby (with a stint of .NET and Java in between). Ben is now contracting with specializations in Ruby, Python, and database migration.

Software Defined Radio workshop Featuring RTL SDR USB Radio 🗓 🗺

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Date: May 18 2019.
Time: 08:00 AM to 04:00 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Dr. Dennis Silage.

Location:
1947 N. 12th St
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
United States 19122

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

A Software Defined Radio (SDR) is a communications system that uses software to define its functionality.  Traditional communications systems utilize hardware to define its principal function, while software provides a user interface and various support functions.  This brings about a limitation because to change system functionality requires different hardware.   An SDR overcomes this limitation, by providing the flexibility to change system functionality by simply modifying or replacing software programs. In other words, an SDR allows easy upgrade to new functionality and improved performance without the need to replace hardware.  SDRs can also be easily modified to accommodate individual applications.  Additionally, advances in modern computing, increased speed and efficient digital signal processing techniques, radio components such as modulators, demodulators, tuners, etc. can all be implemented in software instead.  Hence the term, software defined radio.
This workshop will introduce students to the concepts of SDR, and demonstrate digital signal processing techniques using the low cost, RTL-SDR USB Dongle along with MATLAB/Simulink and the communications toolbox.  Students will perform hands-on simulation activities using the installed MATLAB/Simulink in the ECE lab at Temple University.

Biography:

Dr. Dennis Silage received the PhD in Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1975. Prior to joining the Faculty at Temple University in 1984, he had a biomedical research career, with research faculty and adjunct faculty appointments at the University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, the Medical College of Pennsylvania and the Mount Sinai Medical School. Dr. Silage has been a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Temple University since 1984, teaches digital data communication, digital signal and image processing and embedded processing systems. His research is in these areas with high performance, real-time computational architectures using field programmable gate arrays. He has recently supervised four PhD candidates to completion and twenty-two MSE students. Dr. Silage is past chair of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Division of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), recipient of the 2007 ASEE National Outstanding Teaching Award, the 2011 ASEE ECE Division Meritorious Service Award, the Lindbach Distinguished Teaching Award in 2012. He is a Life Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics.

A Distributed Energy Management Strategy For Resilient Shipboard Power System 🗓 🗺

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Date: May 30 2019.
Time: 05:30 PM to 07:00 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Kexing Lai

Location:
8100 Walton Parkway
New Albany, Ohio
United States 43054

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

The shipboard power system of an all-electric ship can be characterized as an isolated microgrid system. To achieve resilient, cost-effective and privacy-preserved operation of the shipboard power system, a novel energy management strategy is introduced in this talk. Currently, a master controller is required for energy management. However, such a centralized energy management strategy suffers from numerous disadvantages. Therefore, a modified nested energy management method is proposed to preserve privacy and run the microgrid system in a distributed manner for plug-and-play operation. Furthermore, the system resilience is enhanced against energy deficiency by reserving more energy in the cloud energy storage system. This is achieved by a distributed algorithm, known as alternating direction method of multipliers (ADMM), to obtain the solution of an optimization problem with contradicting objectives. Numerical studies are presented to demonstrate the benefits of proposed energy management system.

Biography:

Kexing Lai

Dr. Kexing Lai received the Bachelor of Engineering degree in electrical engineering from Central South University, Changsha, China, in 2014. He received the Doctor of Philosophy degree in electric power systems from The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA, in May 2019.
His current research interests include microgrid protection, power system planning & operation, power system resilience and reliability analysis, power system economics, and applications of machine learning in power systems.

Grid Reliability and Its Vital Signs 🗓 🗺

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Date: Jul 24 2019.
Time: 06:30 PM to 09:00 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Jessica Bian of Grid-X Partners

Location:
4350 Northern Pike
MONROEVILLE, Pennsylvania
United States 15146

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

Frequency, voltage, customer interruption. What do these vital signs tell us about the bulk power system? Learn the grid health underlying the vital signs and how to accurately assess them.  This lecture will explore reliability aspects of bulk power system so that you will develop a systematic, integrated understanding of how to assess the bulk power system reliability.  Additional indicators include energy emergency alerts, transmission outage rates, protection system operations, and resource reserve margin.  The presentation will also provide ranges, trends, and driving factors that influence changes in these indicators.

Biography:

Dr. Jessica Bian is a visionary leader and architect. She has spearheaded electric industry’s reliability metrics and grid risk assessment. She is currently with Grid-X Partners. Before that, she was with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Washington, DC. Previously, she was the Director of Performance Analysis at North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) in Atlanta, Georgia. Under her leadership, a total of 18 industry-wide reliability indicators were established to determine grid reliability, adequacy, and associated risks.  She is widely recognized as a pioneer and trusted world leader in the field.

Magnetics Distinguished Lecturer and Chapter Meeting 🗓

Date: Monday, 05 May, 2019
Time: 11:00 AM to 12:45 PM (All times are America/Chicago)
Speaker: Prof. Hari Srikanth
Location: 3043 ECpE Addition, Ames, Iowa
United States 50011
Building: Coover Hall
Room Number: 3043
Cost: none
Event Details & Registration: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/m/197999

Summary: Magnetic nanoparticles have been building blocks in applications ranging from high density recording to spintronics and nanomedicine [1]. Magnetic anisotropies in nanoparticles arising from surfaces, shapes, and interfaces in hybrid structures are important in determining the functional response in various applications. In this talk I will first introduce the basic aspects of anisotropy and discuss resonant radio-frequency (RF) transverse susceptibility, which we have used extensively, as a powerful method to probe the effective anisotropy in magnetic materials. The tuning of anisotropy has a direct impact on the performance of functional magnetic nanoparticles in biomedical applications such as contrast enhancement in magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic hyperthermia for cancer therapy. I will focus on the role of tuning surface and interfacial anisotropy with a goal to enhance specific absorption rate or heating efficiency. Strategies going beyond simple spherical structures to include exchange coupled core-shell nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes, can be exploited to increase heating efficiency in magnetic hyperthermia [2], [3]. In addition to biomedical applications, composites of anisotropic nanoparticles dispersed in polymers pave the way to a range of electrically and magnetically tunable materials for RF and microwave device applications [4]. This lecture will combine insights into fundamental physics of magnetic nanostructures along with recent research advances in their application to nanomedicine and electromagnetic devices.

Hari Srikanth is a professor of physics at the University of South Florida (USF). He received the Ph.D. in experimental condensed matter physics from the Indian Institute of Science. After postdoctoral research for several years, he joined USF in 2000, where he established the Functional Materials Laboratory. His research spans a wide range of topics including magnetic nanoparticles, magnetic refrigerant materials, spin calorics, and complex oxides. He has published about 250 journal articles and given numerous invited talks.

Dr. Srikanth is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a Senior Member of IEEE. He is an associate editor of the Journal of Applied Physics. He has been closely involved with the Magnetism and Magnetic Materials and INTERMAG conferences for more than 15 years, serving as editor, publications chair, and as a member of program committees.

Vision Guided Robotics 🗓 🗺

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Date: May 09 2019.
Time: 06:30 PM to 08:30 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Kurt Thern.

Location:

E. of intersection of N. Cramer and E. Hampshire St.
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
United States 53211

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

The Milwaukee Section, Robotics and Automation Society presents a 2 hour lab and demonstration on Vision Guided Robotics.  A World Wide Manufacturer of Industrial Automation products will be leading this discussion and live demonstration.  Some audience participation will be possible.

Biography:

Kurt Thern, a Robotic Applications Engineer OMRON Robotics and Safety Technologies, Inc. will lead the discussion on this topic.  The presentation will use Omron equipment, but will be mostly based on Who, What, How and Why on Vision and Robots.  It should be quite interesting for the attendees to be introduced to this hybridized technical subject.Please join us for the presentation by the newly reformed IEEE – RAS in Milwaukee. It is our first event.

The Origins of Silicon Valley: Why and How It Happened 🗓 🗺

“The Origins of Silicon Valley: Why and How It Happened”
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Seminar Date: Tuesday, 21st May, 2019
Time: 05:45PM – 08:00PM AM (EDT)
Speaker: Paul Wesling of IEEE Life Fellow, BS-EE, MS-MatSci (Stanford U); retired from H-P/Tandem
Location: 2260 Hayward St, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States 48109. Building: Bob & Betsy Beyster building North Campus, Room Number: Room 1670
Cost: none
RSVP: required
Event Details & Registration: https://events.vtools.ieee.org/event/register/196683

Summary:
Why did Silicon Valley come into being? The story goes back to local Hams (amateur radio operators) trying to break RCA’s tube patents, Stanford “angel” investors, the sinking of the Titanic, Fred Terman and Stanford University, local invention of high-power tubes (gammatron, klystron), WW II and radar, William Shockley’s mother living in Palo Alto, and the SF Bay Area infrastructure that developed — these factors pretty much determined that the semiconductor and IC industries would be located in the Santa Clara Valley, and that the Valley would remain the world’s innovation center as new technologies emerged — computers, then software, mobile, biotech, Big Data, VR, and now autonomous vehicles — and it would become the model for innovation worldwide…

Agenda
6:00 pm Networking & appetizers
6:40: start of Lecture

Topic: “The Origins of Silicon Valley: Why and How It Happened”

Paul Wesling … Paul Wesling has observed the Valley for decades as an engineer, executive, resident, and educator, and has presented this talk world-wide. An IEEE Electronics Packaging Society Distinguished Lecturer, he will give an exciting and colorful history of device technology development and innovation that began in Palo Alto, then spread across the Santa Clara Valley during and following World War II. You’ll meet some of the colorful characters – Cyril Elwell, Lee De Forest, Bill Eitel, Charles Litton, Fred Terman, David Packard, Bill Hewlett, Russ Varian and others – who came to define the worldwide electronics industries through their inventions and process development. You’ll understand some of the novel management approaches that have become the hallmarks of tech startups, and the kinds of engineers/developers who thrive in this work environment. He’ll end by telling us about some current local organizations that keep alive the spirit of the Hams, the Homebrew Computer Club, and the other entrepreneurial groups where geeks gather to invent the future.

As vice president of publications for the IEEE Electronics Packaging Society for 22 years, Paul supervised four archival journals and a newsletter. He received the IEEE’s Centennial Medal, the Board’s Distinguished Service award, the Society Contribution Award, and the IEEE’s Third Millennium Medal.

ABC’S Of Electric Utilities 🗓 🗺

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Date: 02 May, 2019
Time: 06:00 PM to 08:30 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Steve Wickman

Location: Rock Valley College, Rockford, Illinois, United States, Building: WTC, Room Number: 1308

Cost: none
RSVP: required
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

Overview of the Electric Power System from the generating station to the wall sockets in your house…

–how the transmission systems and distribution systems are put together

–interesting facts about the transmission system network, communications systems used for protective relaying

–interesting facts about the distribution system network

–what makes a “smart grid” so smart?

Steve Wickman 

PE…37 year career as a Power Engineer with Commonwealth Edison in the greater Chicago, IL area.  BSEE from Iowa State University and MBA from Keller Graduate School of Management [DeVry University].  His 40+ year engineering career has spanned work experiences in substation equipment testing and commissioning, design engineering, substation construction and operations management, as well as project management, work scheduling and work controls areas.  Steve is now working as an independent consultant in the electric utility industry.

 

Precision Motion Control for Manufacturing Applications 🗓 🗺

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Date: April 22 2019.
Time: 07:00 PM to 08:00 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Dr. Alleyne of University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Location:
800 Lancaster Ave.
Villanova, Pennsylvania
United States.

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

Manufacturing is one of the key pillars of a modern society. Many aspects of manufacturing center on the precision motion of the machines doing the material removal or addition. This talk will discuss advanced motion control schemes and their applications to manufacturing applications. In particular, we will motivate the use of high performing motion control schemes with precision manufacturing applications at the micro-scale. The key to high precision is the incorporation of feedforward information along with typical feedback algorithms. Iterative Learning Control (ILC) is a popular method to determine signal-based feedforward control. Two different additive fabrication techniques will be examined and the role of precision control highlighted. One is a micro-extrusion system used for tissue scaffold fabrication. Another is an electro-hydrodynamic Jet (or e-Jet) printing that uses electric fields to drive ionic transport. After the demonstration of manufacturing processes, a brief introduction to Iterative Learning Control (ILC) will be given. ILC is a novel adaptive technique that allows us to learn repeated trajectories and maximize precision in the automation machinery used for fabrication. After an overview, the rest of the talk will discuss recent developments in ILC for both single axis and multi-axis systems. We demonstrate the benefits in performance with results in manufacturing applications.

Biography:

Professor Alleyne received his Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering B.S.E. from Princeton University in 1989. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering in 1992 and 1994, respectively, from UC Berkeley. He joined the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1994. He currently holds the Ralph M. and Catherine V. Fisher Professorship in the College of Engineering and is the Director for the NSF Engineering Research Center on Power Optimization for Electro-Thermal Systems (POETS). He is the recipient of an NSF CAREER award, has been an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer, and a National Research Council (NRC) Associate.  He is a Fellow of IEEE and ASME.  He has received the Gustus Larson Award, the Charles Stark Draper Award for Innovative Practice, The Yasundo Takahashi Education Award and the Henry Paynter Outstanding Investigator Award from ASME.  The American Automatic Control Council awarded him the Control Engineering Practice Award. He was a Fulbright Fellow to the Netherlands and has held visiting Professorships at TU Delft, University of Colorado, ETH Zurich, and Johannes Kepler University.  He has held several editorial positions for ASME, IEEE, and the International Federation of Automatic Control and been active in external advisory boards for universities, industry and government including the Scientific Advisory Board for the U.S. Air Force and the National Academies Board on Army Research and Development.  He chaired the ASME Dynamic Systems and Controls Division and is a member of the IEEE Controls Systems Society Board of Governors.  His record of campus service includes the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering and the Associate Head for Undergraduate Programs in Mechanical Science and Engineering. In addition to research and service, he has a keen interest in education and has earned the UIUC College of Engineering Teaching Excellence Award, the UIUC Campus Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Education and the UIUC Campus Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Mentoring.

The Indego Exoskeleton 🗓 🗺

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Date: May  14 May 2019.
Time: 05:30 PM to 08:00 PM (EDT)
Speaker: Ryan Farris of Parker Hannifin Corporation

Location:
22901 Millcreek Blvd.
Highland Hills, Ohio
United States 44122

Cost: Free
RSVP: Required.
Event Details & Registration: (URL)

Summary:

Abstract: In recent years, wearable robotic systems for mobility restoration and augmentation have seen prolific growth. Several of these systems, commonly referred to as “exoskeletons,” have progressed to commercial reality. The development of one of these exoskeleton platforms, the Indego by Parker Hannifin Corporation, will be presented as a case study. The design of the hardware and control will be discussed, and validation of the design hypotheses will be presented as clinical outcomes. System variants will be described that support multiple indications and use cases, including: (1) gait assistance post spinal cord injury (SCI); (2) gait rehabilitation post stroke; (3) functional electrical stimulation of lower extremity muscle groups; (4) stair ascent and descent; and (5) enhanced gait biomechanics for advanced SCI users.

Bio: Ryan J. Farris received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Western Kentucky University in 2007, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Vanderbilt University in 2009 and 2012, respectively. He is a licensed professional engineer in the states of Tennessee and Ohio. As the Engineering Manager for Parker Hannifin Corporation’s Human Motion and Control division, he leads an interdisciplinary team of engineers with expertise in mechanical systems, controls, embedded electronics, software, and biomechanics. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Cleveland State University. His research interests include the design and control of electromechanical devices for medical applications and, in particular, human assistive technologies.